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Wedding Veil Blowing in the Wind

Guide: Wedding Veils

Veils are a quintessential wedding day accessory. But what type of veils should you wear? Let’s go over the different styles of wedding veils and the different lengths they come in, so you have a better idea of your options.

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Veil Styles

Double Tier

Double tier veils have two pieces of fabric, usually at different lengths. Sometimes, the shorter piece is a blusher. 

Double tier veils add some volume and visual interest to clean-cut hairstyles and dresses.

Blusher

A blusher is a short layer of a veil that is worn down in front of the face. Usually, either the groom or the bride’s father lifts the blusher up and over the bride’s head when she reaches the altar. 

Blushers are quite traditional and may be appropriate for more formal weddings.

Birdcage

A birdcage veil is a short veil, usually made of wider netting that’s attached to the head with a fascinator. 

These types of veils were popular back around WWII, making them an excellent option for a vintage-inspired bride.

Pouf

A pouf is a short-yet-bold veil option that makes a statement. Made from gathered bundles of tulle, these headpieces add height, personality, and whimsy.

Mantilla

Mantilla veils are trimmed with lace and hang in front of your shoulders. This Spanish-style veil has its roots in Catholicism, but any bride can wear one.

Veil Styles

Flyaway

Flyaway veils are short and simple multi-tiered veils that fall just past the shoulders. The basic design of these veils makes them an excellent companion for heavily embellished gowns.

Elbow

Elbow-length veils are approximately 25 inches long, reaching the bride’s elbows. This length is ideal for showcasing your curves and drawing attention to the train of your dress.

Fingertip

The fingertip veil, which extends to the bride’s fingertips, is perhaps the most popular veil length. It’s long enough that it cascades nicely, but not so long that it overshadows the dress.

Waltz

A waltz veil is the longest veil option that does not drag along the ground. Typically, the waltz veil falls somewhere between the bride’s knees and ankles.

Chapel

At 2.5 yards in length, chapel veils are a longer, more formal option. Wearing a chapel veil with a sweep train really allows the beauty of the veil to shine.

Cathedral 

Cathedral veils offer the most drama, the most impact, and the most fabric! Most cathedral veils measure about 3.5 yards from end to end.